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Importance Things Need To Know About Bicycles

In the years preceding the U.S. manufacturer of automobiles (which began around 1900), the bicycle became an important means of conveyance and recreation, and it remains an attractive, economical mode of transportation and a vibrant industry in the twenty-first century. By offering riders an uncommon sense of personal freedom and self-reliance, the bicycle has had a profound impact on Americans’ relationship to the environment and one another.


The bike's popularity began to rise in 1876 with the advent of the safety bike, and the bicycle became a primary form of transportation. Here a woman commutes by bike in Portland, Oregon.The bike’s popularity began to rise in 1876 with the advent of the safety bike, and the bicycle became a primary form of transportation. Here a woman commutes by bike in Portland, Oregon. JORDAN SIEMENS/ICONIC/GETTY IMAGES 


The bicycle’s popularity began to rise in 1876 with the advent of the safety bike. Invented by Englishman H. J. Lawson (1852–1925), the bicycle had wheels of similar size and a bike chain to drive the rear wheel. This practical design was changed again in 1895 when the rubber tires were modified to hold air. Mass production of the safety bicycle began in 1885.


These technological improvements, an increase in advertising spending by manufacturers, and a decrease in the average price per unit to around $50 created an explosion in bicycle sales and manufacturing in the late nineteenth century. Whereas in 1890 only 40,000 bicycles were produced in the United States, in 1896 an estimated 1.2 million bikes were provided. The number of manufacturing companies multiplied more than tenfold, from 27 to 312, during the same period.


Among urban middle- and upper-class consumers, the bicycle quickly became the preferred form of transportation, as horse-drawn carriages and streetcars now seemed crowded, slow, and limited in their destinations by comparison. The bike allowed riders to venture outside of their usual locales to explore the city and countryside on what came to be known as a bicycle tour. You can know different kind of mountain bike riding place and best climbing in this http://mountainbikereviewer.com/


Another sociopolitical effect of the bicycle craze of the late nineteenth century was the advent of the female cyclist. Coinciding with the rise of the so-called New Woman—the emerging ideal, championed by a growing contingent of feminists, of an intelligent, independent, and strong-willed woman—the bicycle allowed women a degree of mobility and independence that they had never before enjoyed.


Indeed, in a New York World interview that appeared in 1896, leading women’s rights activist Susan B. Anthony (1820–1906) famously proclaimed, “Let me tell you what I think of bicycling. I believe that it has done more to emancipate women than any one thing in the world. I rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel.


It gives her a sensation of self-reliance and confidence the moment she gets her seat; and away she goes, the picture of untrammeled womanhood.” Female cyclists also initiated some changes to women’s wardrobes in the late nineteenth century, introducing the more practical billowing pants known as “bloomers” as an alternative to the long dresses that had previously been the standard feminine attire.


The bicycle industry yielded some of the many innovators in twentieth-century transportation, including bicycle designer Charles Edward Duryea (1861–1938), who demonstrated the first successful gas-powered car in the United States with his brother Frank (1869–1967) in 1893. Brothers John and Horace Dodge (1864–1920; 1868–1920) introduced the use of ball bearings into bicycle designs in 1890 and later founded the Dodge Brothers Company, one of the most successful American automobile companies. 

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